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3d Printed fishing lures Part 3 – The Results!

3d Printed fishing lures Part 3 - The Results! 1


 
Hey welcome to Gulfstream Outdoors where I help you get the lure out of your head and onto your line. In part three of this series we're going to actually shoot some molds I 3D printed and we're going to see how they turn out. Let’s go!
 
man touching his forehead with pointer finger

 

Processing the Molds

So to post process these molds after you've done printing them, we're going to do a two-part wash in acetone. The first wash is what I call the “dirty wash”- I don't change the acetone that much it's just really to knock off a bulk of the uncured resin off the mold. Once I get done with that I rub it down pretty good, maybe dunk it again and then I move it over to my wash-and-cure station. Here and I dunk it one more time in cleaner acetone and give it a spin, about 30 seconds. With the resin I use you can't really have it soaking in acetone or IPA or anything for too long or it starts to break down so I give it a quick spin for 30 seconds dry it off and look over it real quick to make sure I have all the resin off. Then, I pop it back and I cure it for 25 minutes. So for some resins that's an insanely long time, but for psoriatech scope that I use that is the recommended cure time. Interesting fact, when you don't switch modes on the washing cure you get a wild ride. Elephant’s foot is caused by overexposure of the resin and we do that when we print it flat against the build plate.  Those first layers are overexposed and it spreads out the resin or actually the exposure of the resin and it gives you a lip (or they call it elephant's foot). It's really easy to take care of, I just knock it down with some sandpaper give it a few strokes there and we're all good and we're nice and flat.

multi-cavity worm mold

 

Shooting the Molds

So today we're going to shoot a few different molds, going to heat up plastisol. We have my multi-cavity worm mold we have this weird, I don't know, headless salamander I guess I would call it. We have the mold I made in part two of this video a little Ned kind of ball tail. The reason I’m shooting multiple molds is they all have kind of different venting characteristics. The last Ned mold I have only has a back vent, the other Ned ball mold I have has the side vents that we did in the video. The headless salamander mold has side vents in part, but not all throughout, the body. The earthworm mold has only very large back hole vents, you'll see what trouble that causes. As always when you're shooting plastisol, proper ventilation and a mask is critical. So you'll see here how I use the M5 bolts and the M5 rivet nuts to get this thing all squared up in place and cinch down. Now you'll see on a few of these molds I don't actually put M5 bolts throughout the whole mold because I’m going to use my bench vises to clamp them down into place.  I find it's just a little bit easier to deal with you have less screws and bolts to remove at the end and it holds pretty tight and it's secured in place very, very nicely. I’m actually going to do a two part injection, I’m going to first inject them all with chartreuse then I’m going to go back and clip some tails off and we're going to come back and shoot this kind of purplish galaxy kind of color. This will show that we can actually get two parts of the plastisol to fuse together in these molds and there's nothing weird.

injecting earthworm mold with chartreuse

 

Mold Results

Let's check out the results! These are very interesting to me because I’ve never actually done these types of molds with different venting back-to-back. The molds that had the side venting that I put on in part two, they certainly worked. There's no air bubbles to really speak of, it seemed to vent quite well and I actually got a decent amount of flashing right there, no major air bubbles or anything. But I get a lot of flashing and that's, I think, the vents are too big. The interesting thing here is if you look at this Ned ball mold that I did without any venting other than a single vent in the back, it has a little bit of flashing as well but obviously not as much flashing as the other ones. Then you look at the earthworm mold and it has an oversized vent in the back and it has no flashing and no real air bubbles, although I do have one where I did the laminate that got an air bubble stuck in it in one part but even all the other worms around it came out fine.finished resin lure being taken out of the mold

 

Resin vs. Aluminum

This leads me to an interesting theory, I think that the resin molds are nowhere near as precise as aluminum molds. Any aluminum CNC machine, you're going to get a production quality aluminum mold from it. It’s going to have tolerances at least in the thousands of an inch that's .0001 inches which ends up being like .002 millimeters. My 3D resin printer is pretty darn good by default, it does .05 millimeters and I can get it down to .01 millimeters but I can't get it down to .002 millimeters so I think any venting that I have that I can actually render the detail on is going to be too big and cause flashing now and on top of that. 3D resin printers are not very precise, the edges are not perfectly flat like you'll get with a CNC aluminum mold. They have variations, the resin I’m using has a three percent plus or minus shrinkage. Once you cure it so all that adds up to what appears to be a flat surface but it actually is a relatively uneven surface. I think that plays to our advantage here and those uneven surfaces actually are uneven enough to allow the air to escape so you don't need like this super complex venting system that you would need with an aluminum mold because it's just not as precise that makes our design a lot easier. I got air pockets but I got the air pockets in places that I couldn't really add venting anyways, they were up on the top part of the mold not on the side of the mold where my vents were. I think that might be due to not applying enough pressure on the chute, not shooting cold enough or hot enough. If you have any suggestions on what you want me to try to fix, please leave a comment below and I’ll give it a try in another video. Really there's no better way to produce a prototype mold or a mold that you're going to shoot for yourself than 3D resin printing compared to CNC aluminum.

Epax E10 3D resin 3D printer

 

Printers and Prices

I have two printers, the Elegoo Saturn and the Epax E10 both mid-sized resin printers. The Saturn will run you about $500 before taxes the Epax E10 will run you about high $600 before taxes. I also have the Creality ld002h that runs about $250. Any of those printers will produce molds for you so you're getting into a machine for between $250 and $700 and you'll have some resin costs. Let's just call it right around another $100 for resin and other stuff, then you add a little free software fusion 360 blender and you can be producing molds. The molds are going to cost you each in materials about two to five dollars depending on how they are. I can confidently say for under a thousand bucks you can produce probably hundreds of molds and that's incredible compared to even a desktop CNC machine which is going to run you a few thousand dollars. You got probably $10-$20 in materials and frankly I think it's a lot more complicated because now I need to learn, in addition to CAD I have, to learn CAM to run my CNC machine. At the end of the day aluminum is far superior to resin, it gives you far better results. Less flashing and less hassle but adding a resin 3D printer to your design step makes sure that you have a viable lure that swims exactly how you want it to before you send it off to a CNC machine.

 

Hey guys I hope you learned a ton from this series. Hit that subscribe button, I have a ton more lure videos coming up some really exciting projects that I’m happy to see.  I’m super close to a thousand subscribers and as soon as I get to a thousand I’m going to be doing a really, really cool giveaway that I think you will all enjoy. Take care- tight lines. Get the lure out of your head and onto your line.

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Epax E10 vs Elegoo Saturn – Which one is right for you?

Epax E10 vs Elegoo Saturn - Which one is right for you? 2


What’s up everybody today we’re going to break down the differences between the Epax E10 and the Elegoo Saturn, two mid-sized resin printers. I bought both of these printers will my own money from the original manufacturers. I got the Elegoo Saturn as part of the pre-order that they did and have had it for about nine months. I just picked up the Epax  E10 about a month and a half ago so I think I have a good amount of experience with both printers to give you a breakdown.
Epax E10 printing

Printing

Printing wise these are both the same basic printer 4k monochrome you're going to get fantastic print results with both of these printers there's really no difference between one or the other when it comes to print quality. On the Epax E10 you're gonna get a little bit bigger build volume on the z-axis it's almost a full two inches 50 millimeters an additional z-height.  If you're like me and you're printing fishing lure molds or you're printing larger objects masks helmets things like that extra two inches could really come in handy. Another quick difference is the vat volume the Elegoo Saturn holds about 500 milliliters the Epax E10 holds 700 milliliters again more milliliters better for larger prints less time refilling.
build plate for the Epax E10

Build Plate Design

Let's take a quick look at the build plate design. The Elegoo Saturn has this ball with two set screws in it. It makes it really easy to adjust when you're leveling but it's also very prone to movement especially when you're kind of digging in and knocking off bigger prints from the build plate or just generally moving the build plate around outside of the printer and it bumps around a lot. I had a good deal of problems keeping that build plate level between prints and finally, I just resorted to leveling it after each print. The Epax E10 on the other hand has the kind of more traditional rectangular screw mount setup very very solid it came leveled from the factory and in months of printing hundreds of prints so far I haven't had to level it once it is rock solid. Another quick thing on the build plate design the Epax has, I don't know how to describe it, like a more rounded top to the build plate takes up more space in the vat so I think if you put the Saturn build plate style on the Epact you can eat even more resin in that vat but as it is now as it goes into the vat it really displaces a ton of resin which I guess could be good it's a little annoying though.

Overall Difference

Another big difference is the overall size the Saturn appears tiny compared to the Epax E10 even though they have relatively the same build size just the physical size of them is a lot different. If you're tight on space the Saturn is the one for you and one more quick thing here it's not super important but the Epax E10 comes with a SanDisk cruiser USB which is a little bit nicer USB stick than the more generic one that comes with the Saturn generally you're going to get better lifespan from a SanDisk USB than you will from a more generic USB when it comes to print speed. I don't see any real major differences here again internally I don't know if they're the exact same printer but they appear to be really close to the exact same printer.
difference between printers

Price

Finally, let's talk price and this is where it gets really complicated. The Elegoo Saturn list price is right around $500 if you can find one, they come up on Amazon and they get sold out really really quickly. If you go to Amazon right now there's a good chance that you're gonna only see resellers and they're selling it for about $749.  The E10, on the other hand, I can only really find it available from Epax maybe Banggood and they all have the same relative price of $699. Another thing to consider is at the time of making this video in April of 2021, there seems to be a little bit of a supply chain issue with the Saturn they're rarely in stock on Amazon from Elegoo themselves, and parts are a little bit more difficult to come by. The Epax on the other hand, you can order any parts extra build plates extra vats extra screens whatever you need from their website and it appears to be readily available Elegoo. I’m in the process of replacing my LED screen right now and I had to contact them directly. They were super helpful but I had to contact them directly and they're shipping me one directly from China, it's going to take a few weeks to get here.

The Big Question

So the big question, is the Epax E10 worth $200 more than the Elegoo Saturn? Well, I would say yeah, in general, the better build quality the better construction, and at least right now the readily available parts put it over the top for me. If you are printing for a business the Epax E10 is the solid choice, now that's not to say that Elegoo Saturn is a bad printer,  I've printed hundreds of prints on this thing it is really really good. If these printers were the same price the E10 would barely eke out the Saturn but for two hundred dollars less, the Saturn is an absolutely solid choice. You really can't go wrong with either of these printers guys they're both going to produce fantastic results for you. I'd say if you need that bigger build volume that extra two inches in the z then it's a no-brainer get the E10, if you're just printing minis you're not printing anything too high the Elegoo Saturn will rock your world with its build quality and speed.

Hey guys thanks for watching. Take it easy, take care, and tight lines.
 

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Elegoo Saturn Wireless Network Printing

Elegoo Saturn Wireless Network Printing 3


Hey guys! In this video, I am going to show you how to set up your Elegoo Saturn to print wirelessly via the network. If you're wondering what this has to do with fishing, don't worry because we will find out soon. Let's dive in!

I just bought this Elegoo Saturn which has an ethernet cable port, so I assumed that I would be able to print through that route.  Fortunately, I have an ethernet port in my garage shop, and the printing capabilities work decently for smaller models. Basically, this device will be able to copy the file from your computer to the attached USB hard drive and it is not overly sophisticated.

I had received some questions about a Raspberry Pi setup, but there is no such thing in regard to resin printers. There is a setup in which you can copy a file via the network, but it does not seem terribly efficient. I want to translate that experience to a WiFi network wireless printer, which led me to an Ethernet 2 WiFi product with a janky preparation period.

I followed the lengthy instructions, and the documentation is able to be followed, but after configuring my network I often ran into errors. WPS is functional, so push-button WPS works completely fine. The issue seemed to be related to the ethernet cable itself, or at least that's what my personal issue was.

elegoo saturn 3d printing

After messing around a bit I tried to print out a Squirtle model but continually had more problems. However, after numerous tries, it went through and I am now a proud Squirtle owner! I even tried out two more models with no issues whatsoever, but I think I will switch back to ethernet cables to be safe.

Netgear also makes a range extender that can be very helpful, but the cheaper option at only $48 is an IOGear Adapter.  3-D printing and DIY fishing is my weird combination that I love to work with, and I hope this helped you as well! As always, like and subscribe to my channel.