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3D Printed Resin Wake Bait, a New Era Begins

3D Printed Resin Wake Bait, a New Era Begins 1


First off, let’s talk design principles. I don’t want to do any gluing which is the traditional way of making lures by gluing two halves together. I don’t want to do that and we don’t need to do that since we’re 3D printing. I also don’t want to sand, or in my case, sand as little as possible. It’s difficult to print at least a rounded lure on a 3D resin printer without having to do some sanding from the supports but we’re going to minimize tat as much as possible. Also, ballast or internal weights. I don’t want to add any weight to this lure since it’s a wake bait it’s supposed to float so as long as we get the weight distribution correct, it should float straight up and down like we want it to pretty easily.

wake bait principles

Designing Wake Bait in Fusion 360

Let’s see how we design this lure in Fusion 360. Once I have my body in place I basically want to use a rather organic shaped split line. My thought here is the back part is going to be solid, the body is going to solid resin and the top part of the lure will be the hollow shell. Then, I just execute the split command using that line so I end ip with three bodies. Then, I shell this middle body here and this weight body here. Then, I design my lip and I just place it into the body and I combine those bodies together, cut the lip out of the body but keep the lip here. So then I do a sketch in the front down the center line which I will use to extrude the back part here. Then the front I want to angle so I have this sketch here. After I sketch that line on the plane, I’ll just use the pipe command to fill in those holes.

wake bait design in Fusion 360

Then we move along to the more interesting stuff here which is making the eyes. I draw the eye and then I use the offset command to offset another circle in about 1.5 millimeters. What they want to do is extrude the center hole all the way through and then this hole for the outer ring will go out about half a millimeter to give me this little inset to place my eye into.

Patreon

Hey guys, I know what you’re thinking. I know you’re thinking, “Dude, I don’t want to model a lure, I don’t have time for that! I just want the file!” That’s where you need to join my Patreon community where every month I release all the fishing lures I’ve designed. Whether that;s a hard lure, soft plastic mold, even tools like stencils that you can 3D print on your own 3D printer at home, It’s only $12 a month and you can do whatever you want with the files. You can print them yourself and sell them, you can shoot a bunch of my lures that I designed and sell them to your friends and neighbors and people on the internet. The files comes totally royalty free so follow the link HERE to join for $12 a month.

Freshly Printed Lures

We get our lure out of Fusion 360 and it’s printed. The one thing you’ll see here is that it is very plain with no additional fins or gills or anything like that. When I’m prototyping a lure, I wait to add all of those thing at the end. It doesn’t really impact the performance of the lure but the way I do it is by exporting it out of Fusion 360 and into Blender which is where I add all the fancy features. But, until I get the lure absolutely dead solid perfect, adding everything to it is just a waste of time.

So I’m actually using a blend of resins to print this lure. I’m using Siraya Tech Build with some added Tenacious. I would guess that I used about 30%, I just dumped it in there to look good. The Tenacious adds flexibility which helps actually strengthen the lure body itself and it helps with when I’m putting in the screw eyes that they can kind of bite into the resin instead of it cracking and expanding too much. I don’t know if this is the perfect mix yet, it’s just what I had on hand. We’re going to be getting into resin mixes and which resin is best for 3D printed lures in future episodes.

3D printed wake bait

So I decided to go ahead and print five lures because it takes the exact same amount of time to print one as it does to print five. I figured if I messed up any during painting, or if one had any damage while putting it together I would have some extras to work with. After printing, we just let them go through a quick wash and denatured alcohol, curing and then we are pretty much ready to go. I decided to do some extra curing on this particular lure to make sure that the inside was very well cured. Now I don’t think this is 100% necessary, especially if you’re not using a clear resin because that internal cavity will cure very well. But in this case, I’m going to put some plastic beads and maybe a beanie or two in there and I want to make sure that inside is very firm and well cured so they don’t stick in there. I also printed some diving lips, in this case, more like wake lips on my other printer with some Siraya Tech Blue clear. Again, don’t get too hung up on the exact resin I’m using, my main concern was that t was clear and Siraya Tech Blue clear was the only clear resin I had on hand. It just so happens to be an extremely tough resin, which is great, but I’m not so sure it’s necessary.

Painting the Wake Bait

So before we put that dive lip on we’re going to put the screw eyes in and we’re going to do all of our painting. The dye lift is pretty much the last thing that goes on before the clear coat. This makes it somewhat easier to paint and I don’t have to tape up and mask off that lip which can make painting more difficult.

painting wake bait

Finishing the Lure

So the last think I do after painting is put on the hook. I put a swivel on the back, I don’t like to put a treble hook on the back of my wake baits. For me personally, I’m fishing over a lot of oyster reefs and oyster beds with a lot of grass and so that extra hook in the back doesn’t lead to anymore hookups and it really increases the amount of snags I get. All right, we’re done and let’s see how it floats. If I was smart, I would have done this before I put all this work into it but I just got so excited to paint this lure and see how it works so let’s throw it in the tank and see if it floats. Now that I know that it floats, let’s test it out.

Gone Fishin’

It’s a beautiful morning to test if this wake bait works. It seems to be pretty perfect actually, it’s looking good. I got a nice trout and roughly 8-10 fish and I’d say a majority of them were on my wake bait, it was a good day. I do throw a soft plastic for a little bit and caught a few speckled trout on them, but all the redfish were on my wake bait. But really, there’s nothing better than catching fish on a lure that you made and in this case I made it from scratch. I designed it, painted it, the whole nine yards.

fish caught using wake bait

Fishing Retrospective

Here’s a quick peek at the lure after I was done fishing. Looks pretty good, no major issues. I think most of the scratches you see on the lure are actually from the hook and not the fish. It survived just fine and I was throwing it over oyster beds and all kind of stuff. Like I said, I think there’s four or give redfish on there and at least a couple of speckled trout.

Hey guys thanks for watching! If you’re interested in buying a 3D printer for fishing lures or mold I have a whole playlist HERE where I break down some of the things you need to think about when you’re purchasing a 3D printer. As I progress with this lure and add more videos they’ll be in the lure playlist HERE.

Take Care- Tight Lines

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California Rock Fishing Lure 3D Printed Version

California Rock Fishing Lure 3D Printed Version 3


I miss rock fishing sometimes and my friend Jason, from All Out Blitz Fishing, sent me a message that he wanted me to make him some swim baits for rock fish, lean cod, cabezon, and halibut. He was even nice enough to send me some Dead On plastic salt water blend to make them with. It only took me a few months to get around to making these rock fishing lures, but this is what I came up with.

If you’ve ever used swim baits for rock fish or lead cod, you know they’re pretty basic baits that don’t need a lot of fancy stuff. They're super simple, rock fish and lean cod aren’t that picky. I wanted to make this one special for my friend Jason so I decided that instead of fin on the side, I would use the state of California.

Fusion 360 rock fishing lure

 

I hopped into Fusion 360 and I modeled the body of the bait using my loft technique. Basically, you make a wire frame of the bait and use the loft command to create the body and the tail. I found a .svg of the state of California, then downloaded and imported it into Fusion 360. From there, I scaled and rotated it around and placed it where I wanted it on the body. I just extruded it out from the body, which is a pretty simple and straightforward process.

You can do this process with any .svg, text, or anything else you would want. I completed version one and printed out three molds because it takes just as much time to print out three as it does one and if it works, I have three molds ready to go. Then, I decide to hand pour the molds. Jason mentioned wanting a blue rock Cod, so I looked them up and saw that they have dark splotches against a relatively light blue background. Based on that, I came up with three colors- a purple-ish black, a very light blue and an iridescent white called interference blue. The interference blue is a kind of white that shades blue when you rotate it around, it’s one of my favorite colors. I’m terrible at hand pouring, but if you want to see a master hand pourer go see Chris over at Worlds Worst Fishing. He’s an artist at what he does while I’m just throwing stuff around.

pouring rock fishing lure molds

Then, I just poured the color into the molds then added the top coat which was the interference blue. I was pretty happy but when I went to pop them out of the mold I noticed right away that I had a major problem. The tail section was very think and I didn’t think it would hold up to short bites from Rockfish, especially the smaller ones, even with the tough saltwater plastic. So I popped the frame back into Fusion 360 real quick and made a few slight adjustments. I adjusted the width and the depth of the back tail section and I also beefed up the back of the tail itself and put it at a slight angle. I also added a lot more room in the tail for the plastic to go. Twelve hours later, I have three great 3D printed molds and I go and pour them again.

completed rock fishing molds

I didn’t want to mess around with the hand pouring again since I’m terrible at it so I went with a straight pour this time adding the light blue, then a purple top coat. This time, these came out great and I think they’re going to be absolutely killer. As soon as Jason fishes them, I’ll put a link so you can see the results.

 

If you want to see in depth how these are put together, there is a tutorial. I also emailed this out to my mailing list who got the entire STL file if anyone is interested in printing it out themselves.

Take care and tight lines