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The Best Tool for Removing Resin 3D Prints

The Best Tool for Removing Resin 3D Prints 1


Time to talk about the best tool for removing resin 3D prints. 

Happy 2021!  I have been slammed reorganizing my garage for the last two weeks. Through my reorganization project,  I have discovered a smart and effective new tool that could be used to remove your prints from the build plate on your 3D Printer. The Scotty Peeler. I found this tool after exploring the great Amazon. I discovered there are two different versions of the Scotty Peeler, a metal version and a plastic version. Take it from me,  both have worked amazingly.

3D Print plastic tool

To start, the plastic version works really well for FDM (Fused deposition modeling) prints. Since they are printed flat to the build plate, this tool makes prying those off a breeze. Wondering about resin prints? Yes, you got it! It works for resin prints as well.

3D Prints Metal Tool

Second, the Metal Scotty Peeler is designed as a very smooth-edged and thin blade. This allows you to remove even the toughest stuck on prints just by laying it flat to the build plate and pressing slowly until it gives out. Be sure to wiggle it side by side to make it easier for you. It makes popping out these prints easy no matter the size.

Both tools are valued at about 10 dollars on Amazon. The metals ones, in particular, come two in a pack. While you also have the option of both a plastic and a metal one for the same price. Check them out on my links. As always, if you want to see more of my content, be sure to subscribe here.

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The Complete Guide to 3d Printing Fishing Lures – Part 1

The Complete Guide to 3d Printing Fishing Lures - Part 1 2


Today we're going to be talking about 3D printing and give you a quick introduction with all the information you need to get started on your own! I received a lot of questions after my last video, so to make sure I covered all bases this is part 1 of a series answering questions about software and types of printers to look for.

The first type of printer to look for is an FDM that extrudes filaments out of a nozzle and builds that up in layers to produce your final product. The other major type is a Resin SLA printer, which takes a vat of resin and uses US lights to cure in a certain pattern and produce the model. This type will give you higher resolution and a “better print”, although FDM isn't significantly worse and is much cheaper.

One thing to note is that this a manufacturing machine, so it requires upkeep to make sure that it remains in working condition. Another point to remember is that keeping this in your house may not be the best due to the amount of chemicals and noise it produces. A shop area or garage would be better suited for this kind of product, definitely not in a home office or desk.

3d printed fishing mold

The first major software you need to look for is called a slicer, which takes a 3D model and slices it down, simulates the movements of the 3D printer, and then translates that into something called G Code. For the FDM printer, Ultimaker Cura is the standard operating software and thankfully it's relatively straightforward. As for Resin, Chitubox is another free software, which I don't highly recommend, though CAD or sculpting programs might be a better option.

You are able to create lures that are custom shapes and then sculpt to your liking, although CAD is more for exact measurements and shapes. There is a database called Thingiverse in which you are able to select specific molds from a catalog, including lures I have made in previous videos! You'll have to be patient to learn the programs yourself, though if you wish to hire someone to design them for you, the website to go to is Fiver.

3D printed fish mold

Altogether, it may seem complicated to get started 3D printing but I highly recommend looking into getting started sooner rather than later. As always, thank you for watching this video and be sure to like and subscribe to my channel!

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3d Printed Fishing Lure Molds Better than Aluminum?

3d Printed Fishing Lure Molds   Better than Aluminum? 3


Today we've got a revolutionary idea that I haven't found anyone else on YouTube doing yet! I want to test to see if 3D printed fishing lure molds are functional or even better than those made out of aluminum. I used something called Siraya Tech Sculpt Resin, which has high-temperature tolerance of nearly 380 degrees! The alternatives are much closer to 350 degrees or less, so under a certain amount of pressure, the material will bend or start to deform.

I have never poured this mold before, I downloaded this (did not create it) and will try about 3 or 4 different trials. I will link another video about the printing and creation of the molds once it is finished, and for your reference, I am relatively new to working with resin likes this. Although aluminum is extremely durable, the main downside is going to be cost ($60-300 for different varieties or custom lures).

For this hollow mold using the resin, it was less than $4.00 and took around 3 and a half hours in total using my Elegoo Saturn. When I printed it solid, it increased to $7.00 on a midsize 3D printer. I may have overcooked it and lost some dimensional accuracy but the overall quality is what I'm looking for here. 3d printed mold fishing lure

3d Printed Fishing Lure Molds Better than Aluminum?

After giving it time to cool off post-microwaving, it needs to dissipate the heat. I put roughly 350-degree plastic on the inside, so the plastic needs a while to solidify and then de-mold. The mold was cool at first and has now started to heat up, though I might not have waited long enough.

The detail of my mold is pretty fantastic, though fairly soft after 6-8 minutes or less. I think it would be best to reclamp the mold because it did not warp as much as I thought, as it is hollow with air in the middle. The solid resin as it cured warped more than the current resin walls, and I'll let this one wait for 10 minutes.

Immediately I noticed the hollow mold dissipated heat more, but the molds are much more stuck together. This one is less shiny, including sand and debris, but the color is exactly how I wanted it. My final trial has incredible detail, and I'm very surprised how well they all came out for being my first attempts at this.

Look out for future prints that I am planning on designing, and as always please like and subscribe to the channel! 

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Kayak Stake Out Pole DIY 3D Printed Version

Kayak Stake Out Pole DIY 3D Printed Version 4


I will admit, there are a lot of kayak stakeout pole DIY videos on the internet. These videos usually involve PBC pipe, old ski poles, or other DIY fishing equipment, but I wanted to focus on the idea of 3D printing! There are numerous places where you can find 3D printed materials at a low cost, including local libraries and Makerspace, as well as friends or family that could help you with your 3D printing needs.

I found this piece that was rounded with a relatively small hole that needs some supports but otherwise prints well. For this design, I made it much more square-shaped to both add strength and make it easier to print when laid flat on the build plate.

3D printed kayak stake out DIY

I also added a much larger attachment point so I would be able to attach a carabiner with ease. These tools can be popped on or off relatively quickly and are easier to deal with altogether.

The next step is optional but I painted and primed the kayak handle, and later added some two-part epoxy. I glued it up but placing some in the holes and a bit on the stick, making sure to wait for it to set up.

While waiting, I recommend tying your bungee up, which I was able to do with two carabiners on either side rather than an actual knot. In my Hobie Outback, I have paddle holders which I was able to connect to the back behind the seat.

In terms of materials, I printed this using a basic plastic called PLA, though if you are looking for more strength you can use PETG. And as always, if it breaks you can always print another!

kayak handle uploaded to 3d printing site

If you're interested in looking at the handle I created, I have uploaded it to Thingiverse for just about 90 cents! Combining the handle and the pole, it should cost less than $8 and is likely the cheapest but the highest quality product you can find anywhere online. As always, like and subscribe to my channel if you enjoy content like this!